Facing Fearful Odds: The Siege of Wake Island

By Gregory J. W. Urwin | Go to book overview

I
"AN EPIC THAT SHOULD GIVE EVERY AMERICAN HOPE"

The Birth of the Wake Island Legend

"Where's the Cavalry?"

23 December 1941.

To most people, the date means nothing special. But to several hundred aging Americans whose ranks thin with each passing year, it marked the start of forty-four months of hell on earth. That day, 23 December 1941, they became prisoners of war. It was the day the Japanese captured Wake Island.

Ralph J. Holewinski belonged to the unfortunate Wake garrison. Twenty years old and a corporal in the U.S. Marines, he helped deny the atoll to the Imperial Japanese Navy for sixteen days. For the rest of his life, he will remember the final desperate hours of the siege--the danger, physical pain, and heartbreak--as though they had happened yesterday. The Japanese came before dawn. Forgoing the warning fanfare of a preliminary bombardment, the invaders trusted in darkness to shield them until they reached dry land. Shortly after 2:45 A.M., two converted destroyers containing five hundred to six hundred Special Naval Landing Force (SNLF) troops beached themselves several hundred yards west of Holewinski's battle station.

As soon as he realized the approaching shadows were ships, a Marine lieutenant led Holewinski and two civilian volunteers to a damaged threeinch antiaircraft gun, which, providentially, had been placed near the enemy's future landing zone three days before. A third civilian joined the four Americans at the gun emplacement.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Facing Fearful Odds: The Siege of Wake Island
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 727

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.