The Government of France

By E. Drexel Godfrey | Go to book overview

ward R. Tannenbaum, Chicago, 1961. Finally, it is hardly necessary to observe that a reading of de Gaulle's memoirs, preferably in the original French version, is essential to an understanding of what remains his republic.

Some perennially suggestive works which, although they predate the present government, provide a refreshing insight to French political traditions, ideologies, and the background of French politics are David Thomson's brilliant essay, Democracy in France: The Third and Fourth Republics, 3rd edition, London, 1958; Patrick E. Charvet's France, New York, 1953; the collection of short pieces contained in Modern France, edited by Edward M. Earle , Princeton, 1951; and the now classic critical commentary by the Swiss Herbert Luethy, France Against Herself, New York, 1955. The best short history of the Third Republic is Denis Brogan's witty and authoritative France Under the Republic, 1870-1939, New York, 1948; the best on the Fourth is Jacques Fauvet's La Quatrième République, Paris, 1959.

The only single-volume treatment of the present French constitution is Jean Chatelain's La Nouvelle Constitution et la Régime Politique de la France, Paris, 1959, a book which also contains helpful comparisons with earlier constitutions. Individual studies of the party system under the Fifth Republic are not yet available, but an excellent historical perspective on the subject can be had from François Goguel's La Politique des Partis sous la Troisième République, Paris, 1946, and Jacques Fauvet's Les Forces Politiques en France, Paris, 1951. French foreign policy in the period leading up to the establishment of the Fifth Republic is well explored in Furniss' France: Troubled Ally, and in John T. Marcus' Neutralism and Nationalism in France, New York, 1958.

Two standard works, although somewhat dated, are essential to a full appreciation of the French economy. These are Warren C. Baum 's The French Economy and the State, Princeton, 1958, and Jean-Marcel Jeanneney's Forces et Faiblesses de l'Economie Française, Paris, 1956. On nationalized industry see Mario Einaudi , Maurice Bye, and Ernesto Rossi, Nationalization in France and Italy, Ithaca, 1955. The best analysis in the labor field is Val Lorwin 's definitive work, The French Labor Movement, Cambridge, 1954. On business institutions see Henry W. Ehrmann's Organized Business in France, Princeton, 1957.

On the subject of local government a basic text is Bruce Chapman 's French Local Government, London, 1953. For an inside, comfortable, and non-political view of French life in the

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The Government of France
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Introduction ii
  • Editor's Foreword iii
  • Contents v
  • 1 - The French Republican Tradition 1
  • 2 - The Background of the Social Order 10
  • 4 - The Executive 35
  • 5 49
  • 6 - Political Parties 62
  • 7 - Government and the Economy 88
  • 8 - The Administration, the Judiciary, And Local Government 103
  • 10 - The French Community and Algeria 117
  • 11 - Problems of the Future 158
  • The French Constitution 168
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 185
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