Journals of Ralph Waldo Emerson - Vol. 2

By Edward Waldo Emerson; Waldo Emerson Forbes et al. | Go to book overview

JOURNAL XIX

(From " Sermons and Journals," 1828-29, and Cabot
Q and R)

[SOME letters, written by Emerson to his brothers and aunt during the winter and spring of this year, which are quoted by Mr. Cabot in his Memoirs, show the good sense with which at this critical period he yielded to necessity instead of fighting Fate, like his brother Edward. Thus the elder brother saved and the valiant younger brother lost his life. In one of these letters, Waldo says: "I am living cautiously, yea, treading on eggs, to strengthen my constitution. It is a long battle this of mine between life and death. . . . So I never write when I can walk, and especially when I can laugh." This accounts for the scanty journal-writing in this year, and he refused many flattering invitations to preach. Thus his proper health gradually reasserted itself.]

(From Cabot's R)

January, 1828.

Montaigne says he is sorry Brutus's treatise on Virtue is lost, because he would hear one,

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Journals of Ralph Waldo Emerson - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Journal XV 3
  • Journal XVI 1825 36
  • Journal XVII 70
  • Journal XIX 227
  • Journal Minister of the Second Church of Boston *
  • Journal Xxt 1829 257
  • Journal XXII From 1831 353
  • Journal XXIII 1832 From Ω (blotting Book Iii) Ψ and Q The Good Ear (from Ω) 444
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 548

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.