History of Domestic and Foreign Commerce of the United States - Vol. 1

By Emory R. Johnson; T. W. Van Metre et al. | Go to book overview

CONTENTS.

PART I.--AMERICAN COMMERCE TO 1789.
BY EMORY R. JOHNSON.
CHAPTER I. PAGE
Geographic Influences Affecting the Early Development of American Commerce3
Development of commerce the resultant of many causes , 3.
Analysis of the conditions controlling economic progress,3.
The continental shelf and the fisheries , 5.
Shore line and harbors , 6.
The rivers, the fur trade, and water power , 7.
Glaciation and its consequences , 8.
The Coastal Plain and Fall Line , 9.
The Piedmont, 11.
The Appalachian or Great Valley , 12.
The rivers as highways of inland commerce,13.
The Allegheny passes and the beginnings of western commerce,14.
General results of geographic control ,15.
CHAPTER II. The Beginnings of American Commerce, 1600 to 166017
Newfoundland fisheries in the sixteenth century , 18.
Settlement of America begun by chartered trading companies,18.
Services of chartered companies in early development of American commerce, 18.
The London Company and early trade of Virginia, 21.
The Plymouth colony and its early trade organization , 25.
The Massachusetts Bay colony and its early trade organization, 26.
The Laconia Company, 28.
New Netherland and its trade , 28.
Patroonships and their results, 29.
Early trade of New Jersey and Maryland , 30.
Beginnings of intercolonial trade, 31.
General survey of American commerce in 1660 , 33.
CHAPTER III. The Commercial Policy of England toward the American Colonies: The Acts of Trade35
The mercantile theory , 35.
Origin of the Navigation Acts , 37.
The Navigation and Trade Acts of 1651, 1660, and 1663, 39.
The Administrative Acts of 1673 and 1696, 42.
The Molasses Act of 1733 , 42.
British regulation of colonial manufactures, 44.
English bounties, preferential duties, drawbacks, and other encouragements to colonial industries and trade, 46.
The Grenville, Townshend, and North Acts, 1764-1770, 48.
Effects of the British commercial policy upon colonial industry, commerce, and manufactures, 49.
The illegal trade of the colonists , 51.
Summary of the effects of the Acts of Trade , 52.
CHAPTER IV. Commercial Policy of the Colonies54
Legislative power of colonies over commerce , 54.
Authority exercised by Parliament, the Privy Council, and King, 55.
Import duties of the colonies ,56.
The four purposes of import duties, 57.
Export duties , 59.
Bounties , 60.
Inspection laws, 62.
Embargoes , 63.
Tonnage duties , 63.
Regulation and administration of ports, 64.
Summary of commercial legislation in the colonies , 65.
CHAPTER V. The Early Development of American Commerce from 1660 to 170066
Significance of the period , 66.
Economic and political status of the colonies from 1660 to 1700, 67.
Leading industries: agriculture , 70;
fur trade , 71;
appropriation of forest resources, 71;
the fisheries , 72;
manufactures , 72;
ship-building , 72.
The maritime trade of the colonies as a whole, 73.
New England's commerce , 75.
The trade of New York and East Jersey, 77.
The trade of Pennsylvania, West Jersey, and Delaware,78.
The commerce of Maryland and Virginia and the Carolinas , 79.
General survey of commercial conditions , 81.

-xi-

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