History of Domestic and Foreign Commerce of the United States - Vol. 1

By Emory R. Johnson; T. W. Van Metre et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXI.
THE COASTWISE TRADE OF THE PACIFIC COAST AND THE INTERCOASTAL TRADE.
Beginnings of the intercoastal trade , 358.
Effect of the discovery of gold in California in 1848, 358.
Entrances of vessels at San Francisco , 1850-1853, 359.
Coastwise trade of the Pacific coast, 359.
Intercoastal trade , 1869-1913, 361.
Traffic via Cape Horn and via Isthmus of Tehuantepec, 362.
General effect of the Panama Canal on the intercoastal traffic, 363.

Until after the United States acquired possession of California in 1848 the commerce of that portion of the Pacific coast between the present northern and southern boundaries of the United States was of small volume. The country contained but few people and was for the most part in an early stage of economic development. In the Oregon country the only commerce of importance was that carried on in connection with the operations of Russian, British, and American fur companies, which established posts at various points along the coast or navigable streams during the latter part of the eighteenth and early part of the nineteenth century. The only industries of importance in California were agriculture and stock-raising. This province had by 1848 built up a small trade with England and the United States, exchanging small quantities of wool, hides, tallow, grain, and fruit for manufactured goods and miscellaneous merchandise. For the most part, the commerce was carried on by vessels engaged in the trade with the Hawaiian Islands and the Orient, or by whaling vessels which visited the Pacific hunting-grounds.

The interest of the people of the United States in the region along the Pacific coast was greatly stimulated by the controversy with Great Britain over the Oregon territory, which was settled in 1846, and by the occupation of California by the United States troops during the Mexican War. An important question with which the Government had to deal was that of establishing a more effective system of transportation and communication between the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. In 1846 a treaty was negotiated with New Granada in which the Government of New Granada guaranteed to the Government of the United States--

"that the right of way or transit across the Isthmus of Panama upon any modes of communication that now exist, or that may be hereafter constructed, shall be open and free to the Government and citizens of the United States, and for the transportation of any articles of produce, manufactures, or merchandise, of lawful commerce, belonging to the citizens of the United States; that no tolls or charges shall be levied or collected upon the citizens of the United States, or their said merchandise thus passing over a road or canal that may be made by the Government of New Granada, or by the authority of the same, than is, under like circumstances, levied upon and collected from the Granadian citizens."1

____________________
1
Treaties of the United States, Senate Ex. Doc. No. 36,41 Cons., 3 sess., p. 186.

-357-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
History of Domestic and Foreign Commerce of the United States - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 364

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.