Jenny Lind: the Swedish Nightingale

By Gladys Denny Shultz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER NINE
"This Jenny Lind Business Will Ruin You!"

PHINEAS T. BARNUM would have been the first to admit that his was one of those success stories, from humble beginnings to fame and riches, in which the American public of the nineteenth century delighted. Son of an innkeeper and storekeeper in Bethel, Connecticut, Barnum had started his own career as a storekeeper, with a side interest in lotteries, and had had his first business failure, a necessary ingredient for any true blue success story, before he was nineteen. He had then started a weekly paper, The Herald of Freedom, in Danbury, Connecticut, where he developed the literary style which was to stand him in good stead in publicizing his later ventures. What he lacked in education he made up for in imagination, and while his prose was sprinkled with crudities, and frequently misspelled, it was fluent and never suffered from lack of vividness.

His first firm step up the ladder of fortune came in 1835, when after several experiences with traveling shows and circuses, he bought a wizened, crippled slave named Joice Heth and exhibited her about the country. Barnum's claim that she was a hundred and sixty years old and had been George Washington's nurse aroused considerable controversy in the newspapers, much of which Barnum himself instigated. Barnum, in fact, liked nothing better than to have the papers call him a humbug, so long as they spelled his name correctly. When Joice Heth died, and autopsy showed that she might be ninety years old but could not possibly be any older, Barnum made further publicity capital out of that.

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jenny Lind: the Swedish Nightingale
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.