CHAPTER VI
Cleaving unto Woman 1833-1834

JAMES MILL'S last years brought fulfilment in many ways. In 1830 he reached the highest position attainable in his office career, that of Chief Examiner. His circumstances were opulent. He wielded great influence, both in Indian affairs and home politics. He moved to a fashionable house and had all his nine children growing up around him. He saw the Reform Bill passed and was full of hopes for the country. He had fame and was, perhaps, the richest man alive in true friends, from working men to those in the highest positions. The only clouds were his declining health and the grief John caused him by his stubborn attachment to Mrs. Taylor.

John, too, gained a step in his office career. He had been his father's assistant at £600 a year; he now moved up to Head of his Department and fifth in rank in the hierarchy of the Company, at a salary of £800. Although he could have afforded to set up house for himself, he continued to live at home as a matter of course. He must have felt it a relief not to be any more his father's direct sub- ordinate at the office. They were, however, closely cooperating in piloting the East India Company through a major trouble: the re- newal of its charter by the Government. It is likely that James Mill had been made Chief Examiner for the express purpose of doing this.

By an act of 1813 the Company had received a renewal of its power of India Government, but lost its monopoly of Indian

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Stuart Mill, the Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 160

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.