From State Church to Pluralism: A Protestant Interpretation of Religion in American History

By Franklin Hamlin Littell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
The Colonial State Churches

Most of the European writings in church history still treat American religious life as a footnote to the history of European Christendom. This "footnote" was added out of charity, since the tremendous variety of religious societies in the United States simply demonstrated to the Continental that religious freedom resulted in anarchy and sectarianism. Only recently, under the impress of the ecumenical movement, have a few universities on the Continent begun to pay attention to the burgeoning vitality and strength of the "Younger Churches" of North America, Africa, Asia, and the islands of the sea. What the European scholars have not yet recognized is the fact that, although the American churches were once colonies of European Christendom, today the religious life in the U.S.A. is different in kind from that of the early period. It is not surprising, however, that the European intellectuals should treat church life in America as an unimportant appendix to the mother churches: most American seminaries still do exactly the same thing. American church history is also neglected in the seminaries of this country, and the church views of the sixteenth-century state-church reformers are proclaimed as sturdily as if they actually had controlling significance for the twentieth- century American religious setting.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From State Church to Pluralism: A Protestant Interpretation of Religion in American History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Chapter I - The Colonial State Churches 1
  • Chapter III - The Civil War and Aftermath 63
  • Chapter IV - American Religion at Floodtide 102
  • Index 171
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 178

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.