Electoral Reform in England and Wales: The Development and Operation of the Parliamentary Franchise, 1832-1885

By Charles M. A. Seymour | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE

THE materials upon which the foregoing study is based and to which reference is made in the footnotes, are well known to nineteenth century historians; because of this fact no formal bibliography has been appended. The legislative enactments referred to are to be found in the published series of Public General Statutes, appearing annually since 1830, and published since 1888 under the title of Public General Acts. The Chronological Table and Index of the Statutes ( 1335- 1895) will be found convenient for hasty reference.

Of vital importance for the historian who studies the conditions preceding and resulting from the legislative reforms, is the series of Parliamentary Papers, commonly known as Blue Books. Before the nineteenth century reports of committees were generally printed in the Journals. In 1773 a selection of the more valuable papers not printed in the Journals was made and published. In 1811 further volumes of reports, eleven in number, were published, to which Hansard appended an index and a list of the reports printed in the Journals with their subject matter. In 1825 the series was enlarged upon the recommendation of a committee which advocated the publication of Commissioners' Reports and other papers of interest and importance, as well as reports of committees. Finally in 1837 the public circulation of Parliamentary Papers was fully established.

From 1830 to 1835 the Papers were classified under four headings: Finance Accounts, Estimates and Accountings, State Papers, and Slave Papers. From 1835 to

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