Woodrow Wilson and the World War: A Chronicle of Our Own Times

By Charles Seymour | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
AMERICA DECIDES

THE presidential campaign of 1916, taken in conjunction with the increasing tension of European relations, forced Wilson to a further development of his international ideals and a more definite formulation of the means by which to attain them. As we have observed, the spring of that year saw him reject the doctrine of isolation. "We are participants," he said on the 27th of May, "whether we would or not, in the life of the world. The interests of all nations are our own also. We are partners with the rest. What effects mankind is inevitably our affair as well as the affair of the nations of Europe and of Asia." This recognition of our interest in world affairs immediately took him considerably beyond the position he had assumed during the earlier stages of the submarine controversy. Until the spring of 1916 he had restricted his aims to the championship of neutral and human

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Woodrow Wilson and the World War: A Chronicle of Our Own Times
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Woodrow Wilson and the World War 1
  • Chapter II - Neutrality 27
  • Chapter III - The Submarine 47
  • Chapter IV - Plots and Preparedness 71
  • Chapter V - America Decides 94
  • Chapter VI - The Nation in Arms 116
  • Chapter VII - The Home Front 150
  • Chapter VIII - The Fighting Front 192
  • Chapter IX - The Path to Peace 228
  • Chapter X - Ways of the Peace Conference 254
  • Chapter XI - Balance of Power or League of Nations? 281
  • Chapter XII - The Settlement 310
  • Chapter XIII - The Senate and the Treaty 330
  • Chapter XIV - Conclusion 352
  • Bibliographical Note 361
  • Index 367
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