Woodrow Wilson and the World War: A Chronicle of Our Own Times

By Charles Seymour | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
THE HOME FRONT

ON May 18, 1917, President Wilson issued a proclamation in which are to be found the following significant sentences:

In the sense in which we have been wont to think of armies there are no armies in this struggle, there are entire nations armed. Thus, the men who remain to till the soil and man the factories are no less a part of the army that is in France than the men beneath the battle flags. It must be so with us. It is not an army that we must shape and train for war -- it is a Nation. To this end our people must draw close in one compact front against a common foe. But this cannot be if each man pursues a private purpose. All must pursue one purpose. The Nation needs all men, but it needs each man, not in the field that will most pleasure him, but in the endeavor that will best serve the common good. Thus, though a sharpshooter pleases to operate a triphammer for the forging of great guns, and an expert machinist desires to march with the flag, the Nation is being served only when the sharpshooter marches and the machinist remains at his levers. The whole

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Woodrow Wilson and the World War: A Chronicle of Our Own Times
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Woodrow Wilson and the World War 1
  • Chapter II - Neutrality 27
  • Chapter III - The Submarine 47
  • Chapter IV - Plots and Preparedness 71
  • Chapter V - America Decides 94
  • Chapter VI - The Nation in Arms 116
  • Chapter VII - The Home Front 150
  • Chapter VIII - The Fighting Front 192
  • Chapter IX - The Path to Peace 228
  • Chapter X - Ways of the Peace Conference 254
  • Chapter XI - Balance of Power or League of Nations? 281
  • Chapter XII - The Settlement 310
  • Chapter XIII - The Senate and the Treaty 330
  • Chapter XIV - Conclusion 352
  • Bibliographical Note 361
  • Index 367
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