Woodrow Wilson and the World War: A Chronicle of Our Own Times

By Charles Seymour | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
THE SENATE AND THE TREATY

NEITHER President Wilson nor those who had been working with him at Paris seriously feared that, after securing the point of chief importance to him at the Conference, he would fail to win support for the League of Nations and the treaty at home. They recognized, of course, that his political opponents in the Senate would not acquiesce without a struggle. The Republicans were now in the majority, and Henry Cabot Lodge, the new chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations, had gone far in his efforts to undermine Wilson's policy at Paris. He had encouraged the Italians in their imperialistic designs in the Adriatic and had done his best to discredit the League of Nations. Former Progressive Senators, such as Johnson and Borah, who like Lodge made personal hostility to Wilson the chief plank in their political programme, had declared vigorously their determination to prevent the

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Woodrow Wilson and the World War: A Chronicle of Our Own Times
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Woodrow Wilson and the World War 1
  • Chapter II - Neutrality 27
  • Chapter III - The Submarine 47
  • Chapter IV - Plots and Preparedness 71
  • Chapter V - America Decides 94
  • Chapter VI - The Nation in Arms 116
  • Chapter VII - The Home Front 150
  • Chapter VIII - The Fighting Front 192
  • Chapter IX - The Path to Peace 228
  • Chapter X - Ways of the Peace Conference 254
  • Chapter XI - Balance of Power or League of Nations? 281
  • Chapter XII - The Settlement 310
  • Chapter XIII - The Senate and the Treaty 330
  • Chapter XIV - Conclusion 352
  • Bibliographical Note 361
  • Index 367
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