Behavior Genetics

By John L. Fuller; W. Robert Thompson | Go to book overview

9
Mental disorders

In this chapter we shall cover genetic work bearing on the major classes of mental illness, namely, schizophrenia, manic-depression, melancholia, senile dementia, and psychoneurosis. We shall also touch on investigations of the role of heredity in such disorders as criminality, suicide, homosexuality, mental defect, and epilepsy.

Definitions and descriptions of mental illness present complex problems. One of the most obvious criteria separating the normal from the abnormal person is that the latter, whether voluntarily or involuntarily, is undergoing some form of hospital treatment or in some other way is on a psychiatrist's records. We cannot assume, however, that persons having no contact with a hospital or with psychiatrists are all normal. Many mentally ill individuals, for one reason or another, live their lives in the outside world. Thus hospitalization or case-record criteria are useful only as starting points. They tell us that most individuals in hospitals are abnormal; they do not tell us that all those outside hospitals are normal. Because of this difficulty, genetic surveys of mental illness should always include precautions against the biased selection that can arise from relying on these criteria too rigidly.

More exact ways of diagnosing the abnormal have been described in many text books. One schema, adopted by The American Psychiatric Association ( Noyes and Kolb, 1958), divides mental illness into three major categories as follows: (I) Disorders caused by or associated with impairment of brain tissue function. These may be due to various agents such as trauma, toxins, pre- or peri-natal accidents, infections, and a number of others. (II) Mental deficiency, both endogenous and exogenous. (III) Psychogenic disorders without any clearly defined physical causes or structural brain changes. This last group includes involutional psychoses, the various types of schizophrenia, manic-depression, paranoid reactions, undefined psychotic reactions,

-270-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Behavior Genetics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 400

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.