Innovations in Secondary Education

By Glenys G. Unruh; William M. Alexander | Go to book overview

Contents
Prefaceiii
1--WHY INNOVATE?1
The Milieu of Innovation1
Concerns of Youth4
Concerns of the Public9
Pressures from Social Change10
Diversity13
Questions of Finance17
Educational Accountability19
Future Thinking20
What Innovations?23
2--THE STUDENT: NEW OPPORTUNITIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES27
Changes in Student Roles and Opportunities31
The Continuum Concept of Student Progress40
Grading and Evaluating Student Progress44
Options for Students49
3--THE CURRICULUM: STUDENT-CENTERED INNOVATION AND RENEWAL58
Innovations in the Common Academic Areas58
Innovation in Other Established Areas77
Emergent Objectives and Movements94
Individualization and Instructional Objectives: Complementing or Conflicting?109
4--THE ORGANIZATION: TOWARD OPENNESS116
New Concepts of Time and Attendance117
Modifying the Traditional Organization129
Alternative High Schools137
5--THE STAFF: NEW ROLES AND PARTNERSHIPS146
Changing Roles of Teachers146
Student-Teacher Partnerships for Individualization154
New Members of the Staff161
Emerging Teacher Education Responses167
Accountability and Staff Evaluation and Development172
6--MEDIA: GETTING THINGS TOGETHER180
Resource Centers185
Learning Packages187
Programmed Instruction191
Audio Tutorials194
Multi-Ideas for Multimedia195

-v-

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