Kiowa: A Woman Missionary in Indian Territory

By Isabel Crawford | Go to book overview

Introduction

KNOW of no one better qualified by temperament, acquaintance, and appreciation to write concerning any phase of mission work among the American Indians (the work that during her entire mature years engaged my sister's every faculty) than Miss Isabel Crawford. I am more than glad to commend to the heart and brain of every one interested in missions among a poor, misused, and almost friendless people, the book upon her experiences and observations in Indian missionary service, which she presents to the public. It is sure to be earnest, intelligent and above all lovingly sympathetic. The children of tepee and ranch and range are happy at least in their chronicler. She has lived and wrought and thought amid the shadows, and God's sunshine has tempered these shadows with tints as tender as the changing iris on the breast of the dove, the soft grays that beautify the under-leaf of the olive, and the joy of service, the happiness of duty sings between the lines of her chronicles.

The relations between the author and my sister Mary were always mutually affectionate,

-xxvii-

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Kiowa: A Woman Missionary in Indian Territory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction to the Bison Books Edition v
  • Contents xxiii
  • Introduction xxvii
  • Preface xxix
  • I- Beginnings--Story-Telling--Ghost Dance-- Pigs--Lucius and Mabel 13
  • II- Experiences 48
  • III- The Coming of Miss Mclean 74
  • IV- Giving the Land to Jesus--Oh, for a Man!-- The Den--Two Quarters 98
  • V- The Going of Miss Mclean-An Indian Reception 112
  • VI 133
  • VIII 186
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