CHAPTER X.
1863-1868. ÆT. 60-65.

"Boston Hymn." -- "Voluntaries." -- Other Poems. -- "May- Day and other Pieces."--"Remarks at the Funeral Ser vices of Abraham Lincoln." -- Essay on Persian Poetry. -- Address at a Meeting of the Free Religious Association. -- "Progress of Culture." Address before the Phi Beta Kappa Society of Harvard University. -- Course of Lectures in Philadelphia. -- The Degree of LL. D. conferred upon Emerson by Harvard University. -- "Terminus."

THE "Boston Hymn" was read by Emerson in the Music Hall, on the first day of January, 1863. It is a rough piece of verse, but noble from beginning to end. One verse of it, beginning "Pay ransom to the owner," has been already quoted; these are the three that precede it: --

I cause from every creature
His proper good to flow:
As much as he is and doeth
So much shall he bestow.

But laying hands on another
To coin his labor and sweat,
He goes in pawn to his victim
For eternal years in debt.

-240-

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