The Missouri and North Arkansas Railroad Strike

By Orville Thrasher Gooden | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
THE REIGN OF THE HARRISON CITIZENS' COMMITTEE

THE large number of serious depredations, a disturbance in Harrison on January 12 in connection with the arrest of some men charged with bridge-burning, together with the bulletin issued by General Manager Murray on January 13, were the signal for a determined movement on the part of the citizens to "end the strike" once for all. All that was needed for a gathering at Harrison of determined citizens from along the road was a suggestion from some source. Just who sent out the call has never been revealed; few of those who took part know where it originated. Some think it originated at Harrison, others say at Marshall, and still others Leslie. Suffice it to say that the phones were busy late Saturday and Sunday and messengers were sent out in many cases. Early Monday morning, January 15, 1923, armed men began to gather in Harrison from every direction. About noon a special train came in from Leslie loaded with armed men. This train was chartered and paid for ($502) by a small group of citizens. It has been generally agreed that about a thousand men were on the streets by night. A committee of twelve men representing the various communities was selected to investigate the strikers and the depredations. The committee was composed of Sam Dennis, traveling salesman of Valley Springs; L. C. Holt, business man of Harrison; Dr. Troy Coffman, dentist of Harrison; Tom Morris, canner and grocer of Berryville; George Bazore, miller of Berryville; W. J. Douglas, editor of the North Arkansas Star, Berryville; J. F. Henley, attorney of

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Missouri and North Arkansas Railroad Strike
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 278

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.