Alzheimer Discourse: Some Sociolinguistic Dimensions

By Via Ramanathan | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book argues that almost everything we say depends, to a large extent, on whom or what we are interacting with, that social factors influence not only what we say, but the fluency and ease with which we say it as well. Thus, to acknowledge the contribution of some people who made this book happen is to thank them in a small way not only for shaping my ideas and views but also for enabling me to speak.

My professors at the University of Southern California -- Elaine Anderson, Ed Finegan, James Gee, Robert Kaplan, Elinor Ochs -- introduced me to the multifaceted prism that linguistics is and taught me in their individual ways that language use is always and everywhere social. James Gee, my mentor, told me on several occasions that his research was interest on the capital his mentors had given him; I think I know now what he meant. I like to think that the research represented in this book is interest gained on the time and effort he spent in reading several drafts and providing valuable feedback. His views about discourse analysis -- its moral function and humanistic value -- have influenced me enormously.

Although Robert Kaplan has little direct connection to Alzheimer discourse, his friendship and support in almost every other area of my life have been tremendous. Our overlapping research interests and e-mail discussions on issues in second language literacy have in some strange way percolated down to the analysis presented here. His foresight, clarity, and bird's-eye view of all matters linguistic are things from which I have benefited immensely. I have adopted him as my godparent whether he likes it or not.

I need to thank several other people as well. It was a pleasure to work with Don Ellis, the series editor, whose views and research on discourse I find stimulating. I especially appreciate his easygoing manner and the latitude he allowed me throughout this project. Heidi Hamilton's feedback on some of my writing and her general enthusiasm for promoting and furthering discourse analysis of language to, and by, "ailing" people reinforces my faith in the subject all the time. The faculty members in the English department at the University of Alabama -- especially Salli Davis and Catherine Davies -- have been most supportive. I am also grateful to the Research Grants Committee at UA for awarding me grant money to do some follow-up research one summer. Elsevier, Guilford Publications, and Cambridge University Press kindly gave me permission to reprint some of my research.

I cannot end this without mentioning the patients and their families who so obligingly found time for me, especially Tina, her husband, and Ellie. Nor can I end

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Alzheimer Discourse: Some Sociolinguistic Dimensions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 138

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.