Alzheimer Discourse: Some Sociolinguistic Dimensions

By Via Ramanathan | Go to book overview

2
Theoretical Framework

At certain moments in life, prompted by the excitement of some major event, we look ahead in time and think quite simply, I shall remember this forever." And this awareness in itself seems to change the present experience, to enhance it like some object being lit suddenly from a new side. These are among the very few times that we have direct and honest contact with our future selves. Otherwise we are largely, and in a sense unnecessarily, exited from our own future.

-- Robert Grudin ( 1982)

The quote from Grudin's The Time and Art of Living has several interesting implications regarding how we "invent" ourselves ( Bruner & Weisser, 1991) through the life stories we tell. The idea of "major events" calls to mind Linton's ( 1987) idea of "significant memories," ( 1982), memories that critically inform the kind of story(ies) we tell about ourselves. It also makes us aware of the temporal dimensions, the simultaneously present and past nature, if you will, of our life stories: Although they are about our pasts, they are, at the moment of telling, rooted in the present. Implied also is the genre of (re) telling: It is, in most cases, a narrative ( Tonkin, 1992).

All of these implications are central to the discussion in this chapter. The life story as a form revolves around notions of identity and self ( Bruner & Weisser, 1991); the question, "Who am I am?" is at the heart of the life story genre although it is not necessarily a question overtly acknowledged by tellers. That is, tellers do not necessarily tell their life stories in response to "Who are you?" or proceed with "I am going to tell you who I am" (although these prompts cannot be ruled out). They are more likely to tell them in more naturalistic occasions as when a group of people are exchanging stories about certain times in their lives.

Regardless, at least for the moment, of how the life story emerges, the question "Who am I?" has particular implications for the elderly. As Sherman ( 1991) put it, the elderly are likely to frame this question as "Who have

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Alzheimer Discourse: Some Sociolinguistic Dimensions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 138

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.