The Moors in Spain

By Stanley Lane-Poole; Arthur Gilman | Go to book overview

XIV.
BEARING THE CROSS.

BOABDIL'S "last sigh" was but the beginning of a long period of mourning and lamentation for the luckless Moors he had ushered to destruction. At first, indeed, it seemed as if the equitable terms upon which Granada had capitulated would be observed, and freedom of worship and the Mohammedan law would be upheld. The first archbishop, Hernando de Talavera, was a good and liberal-minded man, and forcible conversion formed no part of his policy. He strictly respected the rights of the Moors, and sought to win them over by force of example, by uniform justice and kindness, and by conforming as far as possible to their ways. He made his priests learn Arabic, and said his prayers in the same ungodly tongue, and by such concessions "so wrought on the minds of the populace that in 1499, when Cardinal Ximenes was sent by the queen to aid him in the work, it seemed as if the scenes which occurred at Jerusalem in the infancy of the Faith were about to be reënacted at Granada. In one day no less than 3,000 persons received baptism at the hands of the Primate, who sprinkled them with the hyssop of collective regeneration."1 Ximenes was little in harmony

____________________
1
Sir W. Stirling Maxwell: Don John of Austria, i. 115.

-269-

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The Moors in Spain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xiii
  • List of Illustrations xix
  • I - The Story of the Moors in Spain 1
  • II - The Wave of Conquest. 23
  • III - The People of Andalusia. 39
  • IV - A Young Pretender. 58
  • V - The Christian Martyrs. 78
  • VI - The Great Khalif. 96
  • VII - The Holy War. 114
  • VIII - The City of the Khalif. 129
  • IX - The Prime Minister. 152
  • X - The Berbers in Power. 167
  • XI - My Cid the Challenger. 185
  • XII - The Kingdom of Granada. 214
  • XIII - The Fall of Granada. 246
  • XIV - Bearing the Cross. 269
  • Index to the Text and the Notes 281
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