The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication

By William R. Cupach; Brian H. Spitzberg | Go to book overview

She considers how transgressions are semantically constructed as well as behaviorally negotiated by relational partners. The next two chapters in this section focus on aspects of communication within families. Petronio presents an original program of research grounded in the theory of communication boundary management. Specifically, she applies the theory to the context of parents invading the privacy of their college-aged children. Her work illuminates how parents and children manage privacy invasion as well as the consequences for parent-child relationships. In contrast, the chapter by Stafford and Dainton investigates presumably "normal" family interaction in broader strokes. The authors debunk myths regarding the institution of family in America, and illustrate the darker side of certain aspects of routine, day-to-day interaction among members of "ordinary" families. The authors also briefly review social-political and feminist critiques of the family. The final chapter in section four by Marshall thoroughly overviews the concept of abuse in relationships. Following an explication of key findings regarding physical abuse and violence, she offers a fresh perspective on the elusive phenomenon of psychological abuse. Marshall suggests that some of the deleterious effects previously associated with physical violence may actually stem from the more subtle forms of psychological abuse.

In the closing chapter, we offer a brief epilogue to the numerous provocative issues raised in this volume. We consider what the darkness metaphor implies for the study of human interaction. We also forecast some themes that could be profitably elaborated in supplementary volumes on the dark side.

We sincerely thank our friends and colleagues who supported us in our endeavor to illuminate the dark side. We are especially grateful to the talented authors whose provocative contributions comprise this book. We also acknowledge the contribution of Michael Hecht, who facilitated critical discussion about the dark side during a program at the Western States Communication Association in Albuquerque. Thanks are also due to Mary Doud and Emily Reece who carefully and patiently assisted us with manuscript minutiae.

-- William R. Cupach

-- Brian H. Spitzberg


REFERENCE

Burke K. ( 1966). Language as symbolic action. Berkeley: University of California Press.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 337

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.