The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication

By William R. Cupach; Brian H. Spitzberg | Go to book overview

depend on the nature of their relationship -- how intimate they are, how satisfied they are, and how open they are with one another about emotional issues.

In sum, the findings of this research suggest that the old adage concerning "sticks and stones" requires, at the very least, a lengthy addendum. Hurt is a socially elicited emotion ( de Rivera, 1977) -- people feel hurt because of the interpersonal behavior of others. Because feelings of hurt are elicited through social interaction, words can "hurt" -- both individuals and relationships.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The author would like to thank Bill Cupach, Steve Duck, Robert Hopper, Mark Knapp, and Brian Spitzberg for their contributions to this chapter.


REFERENCES

Andrews B. ( 1992). "Attribution processes in victims of marital violence: Who do women blame and why?" In J. H. Harvey, T. L. Orbuch, & A. L. Weber (Eds.), Attributions, accounts, and close relationships (pp. 176-193). New York: Springer-Verlag.

Austin J. L. ( 1975). How to do things with words ( 2nd ed., J. O. Urmson & M. Sbisa, Eds.). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Averill J. R. ( 1980). "A constructivist view of emotion". In R. Plutchik & H. Kellerman (Eds.), Theories of emotion (Vol. 1, pp. 305-339). New York: Academic Press.

Baxter L. A., & Wilmot W. W. ( 1984). "Secret tests: Social strategies for acquiring information about the state of the relationship". Human Communication Research, 11, 171-201.

Berscheid E. ( 1983). "Emotion". In H. H. Kelley, E. Berscheid, A. Christensen, J. H. Harvey, T. L. Huston, G. Levinger, E. McClintock, L. A. Peplau, & D. R. Peterson (Eds.), Close relationships (pp. 110-168). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.

Berscheid E., & Walster E. ( 1974). "A little bit about love". In T. L. Huston (Ed.), Foundations of interpersonal attraction (pp. 355-381). New York: Academic Press.

Booth A. (Ed.). ( 1991). Contemporary families: Looking forward, looking back. Minneapolis: National Council on Family Relations.

Bowers J. W. ( 1989). "Introduction". In J. Bradac (Ed.), Message effects in communication science (pp. 10-23). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Bowers J. W., Metts S. M., & Duncanson W. T. ( 1985). "Emotion and interpersonal communication". In M. L. Knapp & G. R. Miller (Eds.), Handbook of interpersonal communication (pp. 500-550). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.

Bradac J. J., Hopper R., & Wiemann J. M. ( 1989). Message effects: Retrospect and prospect. In J. Bradac (Ed.), Message effects in communication science (pp. 294-317). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Brown P., & Levinson S. ( 1978). Politeness: Some universals in language usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bryant F. B., & Veroff J. ( 1982). "The structure of psychological well-being: A sociohistorical analysis". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 43, 653-673.

Bulmer M. ( 1979). "Concepts in the analysis of qualitative data". Sociological Review, 27, 651-677.

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