The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication

By William R. Cupach; Brian H. Spitzberg | Go to book overview

children. Perhaps, parents may even conceive of invasions as necessary in being "good" parents. From this view, the kinds of reactions discussed in this chapter may perplex these parents. This type of speculation is beyond the current chapter, but to form a more complete picture of family privacy binds, it seems important to compare the parents' perspective with the college-age children's point of view.

Regardless of the parents' orientation to privacy violations of their children, the point remains that from these data, college-age children believe that invasions comprise the parent-child relationship in meaningful ways. As Youniss and Smollar ( 1985) point out, "individuality, which is probably a primary issue between parents and adolescents, develops gradually through a series of accommodations. . . . The parents retain authority by giving more freedom to adolescents by recognizing their personal needs and capabilities" (pp. 158, 162).


REFERENCES

Altman I. ( 1975). "Environmental and social behavior: Privacy, personal space, territory, and crowding". Monterey, CA: Brooks/Cole

Altman I., Vinsel A., & Brown B. ( 1981). "Dialectic conceptions in social psychology: An application to social penetration and privacy regulation". In L. Berkowitz (Ed.), Advances in ex perimental social psychology(Vol. 14, pp. 108-160). New York: Academic Press

Baxter L., & Wilmot W. ( 1984). "Secret tests: Strategies for acquiring information about the state of the relationship". Human Communication Research, 5, 264-272

Berardo F. M. ( 1974). "Family invisibility and family privacy". In S. Margulis (Ed.), Privacy (pp. 55-72). Stony Brook, NY: Environmental Design Research Association

Burgoon J., Parrot R., Le B. Poire, Kelley D., Walther J., & Perry D. ( 1989). "Maintaining and restoring privacy through communication in different types of relationships". Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 6, 131-158

Callan V., & Noller P. ( 1986). "Perceptions of communicative relationships in families with adolescents". Journal of Marriage and the Family, 48, 813-820

Campbell E., Adams G., & Dobson W. ( 1984). "Familial correlates of identity formation in late adolescence: A study of the predictive utility of connectedness and individuality in family relations". Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 13, 509-525

Chelune G. ( 1979). Self-disclosure. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass

Coleman J., & Hendry L. ( 1990). The nature of adolescence. London: Routledge

Derlega V., & Chaikin A. ( 1977). "Privacy and self-disclosure in social relationships". Journal of Social Issues, 33, 102-115

Doster J., & Strickland B. ( 1969). "Perceived childrearing practices and self-disclosure patterns". Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 33, 382

Gilbert S., & Whiteneck G. ( 1976). "Toward a multidimensional approach to the study of selfdisclosure". Human Communication Research, 3, 347-355

Grotevant H., & Cooper C. ( 1986). "Individuation in family relationships: A perspective on individual differences in development of identity and role-taking skill in adolescence". Human Development, 29, 82-100

Hendrick S. ( 1987). "Counseling and self-disclosure". In V. Derlega & J. Berg (Eds.), Self-disclosure: Theory, research and therapy (pp. 303-324). New York: Plenum.

-256-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 337

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.