Emotional Development in Atypical Children

By Michael Lewis; Margaret Wolan Sullivan | Go to book overview

be correlated with attachment ratings of children with autism, although nonverbal requesting does appear to correlate with attachment in these children ( Capps, Sigman,& Mundy, 1994). Thus, although scant research may currently be brought to bear on this important issue, the data that exist are not inconsistent with the hypothesis that joint attention and attachment measures may provide independent but complimentary indices of risk for socioemotional disturbance in preschool children. We are currently examining this hypothesis in a longitudinal study of infants and toddlers who are at risk for the development of behavior disturbance.


SUMMARY

In this chapter we have attempted to argue that the study and assessment of nonverbal communication skills development, especially in the second year of life, may be of considerable value for research on early socioemotional development. Several systems of assessment of nonverbal communication skills have been developed. However, all too often these assessments are considered only in conjunction with research on language development, or perhaps sociocognitive development. Nevertheless, both new and old research and theory suggest that nonverbal communication development, especially joint attention development, may reflect processes that are critical to adaptive and maladaptive socioemotional development in preschool children. To illustrate this point, we briefly described how Stern's( 1985) theory on early intersubjectivity and affective attunement between caregivers and toddlers may be related to the development of nonverbal communications skills. We have also described a sociornotivational model of joint attention development and extrapolated from this model the hypothesis that joint attention and attachment measures may be complimentary, but independent predictors of behavior development in preschool children. At the outset, however, we noted that the circumscribed views presented here did not do justice to the numerous possible connections between early nonverbal communication and subsequent socioemotional development in children. We hope this chapter serves to encourage others to begin to examine this potentially important linkage in early development.


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

The preparation of this chapter was supported by NIDCD Grant #00484.


REFERENCES

Adamson L.,& Bakeman R. ( 1985). "Affect and attention: Infants observed with mothers and peers." Child Development, 56,582-593.

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Emotional Development in Atypical Children
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.