The Environment and Mental Health: A Guide for Clinicians

By Ante Lundberg | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Introduction

Ante Lundberg Washington, DC Commission on Mental Health Services

By the term environment mental health professionals usually mean an individual's family and immediate social circle. Psychotherapy tends to focus on intrapsychic events and on interaction with the closest family and social group. In recent decades, the focus has shifted to biological determinants of individual experience and behavior, to the genetics of serious mental illness, and to pharmacotherapy for psychiatric disorders.

Genetics and family environment combine to mold a person ( Eisenberg, 1995), but growing evidence shows that the nonsocial environment -- biological and physical -- is important as well, not only for health and psychological functioning, but also for psychiatric morbidity ( Lundberg, 1996; Schottenfeld, 1992). Toxins and traumatic experiences such as natural disasters cause illness and vulnerability. Epidemiological data show a sharp rise in depression among adolescents and young adults ( Kessler et al., 1994). On the other hand, interacting with the living world, even contemplating pictures of nature, can have therapeutic effects ( Katcher & Wilkins, 1993; Ulrich, 1993).

Anecdotal evidence indicates that clinicians see more and more patients who have been exposed to environmental poisons or environmental stress, who worry about environmental threats, or who are preoccupied with the fate of the environment. Often such concerns are irrational and can be seen as representing cognitive dysfunction or neurotic defense such as displacement or rationalization. But in some cases the fears are well founded.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Environment and Mental Health: A Guide for Clinicians
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 233

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.