Economic Botany: A Textbook of Useful Plants and Plant Products

By Albert F. Hill | Go to book overview

PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION

For some years past there has been an ever-increasing feeling among educators that the average college courses in elementary science have fallen far short of meeting the needs of the average student. For the most part such courses have been conducted on the supposition that their sole purpose was to lay the foundation for further advanced work in their particular field. For the man who knows what he wants, this is essential. Many students, however, fall into other categories. Some take a first course because it is required; others to see whether or not they might become seriously interested in a subject; and still others out of idle curiosity or some less tangible reason. In such cases an elementary course should be so constituted as to be interesting and profitable to the extent of adding to the student's general fund of knowledge even if he does not continue in the field. In other words the course should have more of a cultural than a purely technical value. As Gager states it in the preface to his "General Botany," "A subject has cultural value in proportion to the number of human contacts it gives the pupil, the extent to which it broadens his views and extends his interests and sympathies."

The field of applied science, dealing with the practical or economic aspects of a subject, lends itself much better to such treatment than does the field of pure science. This is particularly true of botany. From earliest time plants have been intimately bound up with human existence. Not only have they played an important part in the everyday life of mankind, but they have had a profound influence on the course of history and civilization. A knowledge of the industrial, medicinal, and edible plants cannot fail to broaden one's outlook.

Even though the value of including a considerable amount of economic material in a beginning course in botany may be recognized, the limitations of time or various curriculum requirements usually render such a procedure impracticable. It should be possible, however, to offer at least a half-year course devoted to economic plants as a supplement to the usual first year's work. Such a course would appeal to students in chemistry, economics, and other fields, as well as to those interested particularly in plant science. Moreover, such a course in economic botany ought to be valuable to the science itself. Botany, more than any other science, has suffered from a lack of interest and appreciation on the part of the average person. Any attempt to educate the layman as to the importance of plants cannot fail to be productive of some

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Botany: A Textbook of Useful Plants and Plant Products
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 560

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.