Theory and Theology in George Herbert's Poetry: Divinitie, and Poesie, Met

By Elizabeth Clarke | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I would like to thank the supervisors of my thesis, Dr Nigel Smith and the Right Revd Dr Rowan Williams, for their inspirational help and guidance. The readers for Oxford University Press, Dr Paul Fiddes and Dr Judith Maltby, supplied invaluable comment and criticism. Sean Hughes of Trinity College Cambridge and Dr Diarmaid McCulloch of St Cross College, Oxford helped me with the vexed question of early seventeenth-century theology. I am grateful to Dr Timothy Bartel for checking the thesis for theological and editorial errors. Thanks too to Emily's many baby-sitters, especially my mother, without whom this book would not have been finished, and to Jean-Pierre, Alan, and Russell in Duke Humfrey, who have forced me to modify my opinion of librarians. However, I owe most to my husband Matthew Stiff, who has supplied meticulous proof-reading and computer expertise, and has generally kept me sane during the writing of this book.

-v-

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