The Triumph of Campaign-centered Politics

By David Menefee-Libey | Go to book overview

earlier. The DCCC's leaders had followed their Republican counterparts in embracing the Accommodationist paradigm and had gradually convinced Democrats in the House that the DCCC could play an influential role in national elections just as the NRCC did. The committees and their professional staffs had become fullfledged partners in the Washington establishment, for better and for worse. And though they could not insulate themselves entirely from the turbulent politics of the party-in-government, they had gained a large degree of autonomy and stability. The public clearly disliked the professionalized system of representation, deliberation, and choice the committees served, but the system worked, and both Democrats and Republicans in Congress intended to keep it.


NOTES
1.
Hugh Bone, Party Committees and National Politics ( Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1958), chap. 5.
2.
Neal Gregory, "New Shriver Group Bolsters Democrats' Congressional Campaigns," National Journal, 12 September 1970, 1993.
3.
Herbert Alexander, Financing the 1960 Election ( Princeton, N.J.: Citizens' Research Foundation, 1962), 80-81; and Alexander, Financing the 1964 Election, ( Princeton, N.J.: Citizens' Research Foundation, 1966), 114-15.
4.
Gregory, "New Shriver Group," 1994.
5.
Bone, Party Committees and National Politics, 141.
6.
Kenneth Harding, telephone interview by author, June 1988, and Edmund Henshaw's wife, Barbara, telephone interview by author, May 1988.
7.
Harding, interview.
8.
Harding, interview.
9.
William Chapman, "Democrats Advance Fund Aid," Washington Post, 18 September 1969; and Andrew J. Glass, "Low Cost TV and Radio Facilities Prove Popular in Election Year," National Journal, 11 July 1970, 1484.
10.
Harding, interview.
11.
See, for example, Alexander, Financing the 1960 Election, chaps. 5-7.
12.
For contemporary discussions of the rise of this new politics in congressional races, see Dwight Jensen et al., "Professional Managers, Consultants Play Major Roles in 1970 Political Races," National Journal, 26 September 1970, 2077-87; and Robert Agranoff, "The New Style of Campaigning: The Decline of Party and the Rise of Candidate-Centered Technology," reprinted in Parties and Elections in an Anti-Party Age, ed. Jeff Fishel ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1978, 230-40.

-148-

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The Triumph of Campaign-centered Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Parties, Elections, and American Democracy 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - The Campaign-Centered Electoral Order 11
  • Notes 27
  • 3 - The Foundations of Campaign-Centered Politics 32
  • Notes 44
  • 4 - Campaign-Centered Politics Leaves the Parties Behind 49
  • Notes 63
  • 5 - Reform and the Search for a New Party-Centered Politics 66
  • Notes 86
  • 6 - Embracing Campaign-Centered Politics 92
  • Notes 112
  • 7 - The New Politics on Capitol Hill 118
  • Notes 148
  • 8 - Campaigns and Parties in the Senate 154
  • Notes 176
  • 9 - The New Conventional Wisdom, Fraying at Its Edges 181
  • Notes 204
  • 10 - The Resilience of Campaign-Centered Politics 211
  • Notes 220
  • Index 223
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