The Triumph of Campaign-centered Politics

By David Menefee-Libey | Go to book overview

(p. 195) shows that, like other national party committees, the DSCC grew increasingly dependent on soft money for its work, but Kerrey drew widespread praise for the committee's targeting of contributions and assistance. 76 Given that Republicans began the cycle predicting a filibuster-proof majority of sixty seats, Democrats were more than happy to come away from the election with a 55-45 split, no net change.

In fact, incoming 1999-2000DSCC ChairRobert Torricelli (D-N.J.) had spent much of 1998 looking forward to 2000, when the large Republican "Class of 1994" would face the voters. "1998 is disproportionately a defensive effort and 2000 is clearly all-out offense," he had acknowledged in July. 77 Given the public backlash against Senate Republicans' handling of the Clinton impeachment trial, regaining a Democratic majority in the Senate in 2000 seemed like a reasonable goal as Torricelli stepped into the DSCC leadership.


NOTES
1.
Thomas S. Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, 2d ed. ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1970).
2.
See, for example, John Frendreis and Alan R. Gitelson, "Local Parties in the 1990s: Spokes in a Candidate-Centered Wheel," in The State of the Parties: The Changing Role of Contemporary American Parties, 3d ed., ed. John C. Green and Daniel M. Shea (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1999).
3.
See Trevor Potter, "Where Are We Now? The Current State of Campaign Finance Law"; Anthony Corrado , "Money and Politics: A History of Federal Campaign Finance Law"; and Corrado, "Soft Money," in Campaign Finance Reform: A Sourcebook, ed. Anthony Corrado, Thomas E. Mann, Daniel R. Ortiz, Trevor Potter, and Frank J. Sorauf ( Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, 1997). See also John F. Bibby, "Party Networks: National-State Integration, Allied Groups, and Issue Activists"; and Melanie Blumberg, William Binning, and John C. Green, "Do the Grassroots Matter? The Coordinated Campaign in a Battleground State," in Green and Shea, State of the Parties.
4.
John F. Harris, "President Fills Top Positions," Washington Post, 14 December 1996, A1. See also Anthony Corrado, "The Politics of Cohesion: The Role of the National Party Committees in the 1992 Election," in The State of the Parties: The Changing Role of Contemporary American Parties, ed. Daniel M. Shea and John C. Green (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1994); Laura Berkowitz, Connie Krauss, and Daniel M. Shea, "The Evolving Role of the National Committees in the 1990s," conference paper, University of Akron, October 1997.
5.
For an excellent illustration of such committees' constant efforts to recruit candidates, see Tim Curran, "Senate Democrats Have Y2K Theory: Some Are Looking Ahead to Take BackControl in 2000,"

-204-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Triumph of Campaign-centered Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Parties, Elections, and American Democracy 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - The Campaign-Centered Electoral Order 11
  • Notes 27
  • 3 - The Foundations of Campaign-Centered Politics 32
  • Notes 44
  • 4 - Campaign-Centered Politics Leaves the Parties Behind 49
  • Notes 63
  • 5 - Reform and the Search for a New Party-Centered Politics 66
  • Notes 86
  • 6 - Embracing Campaign-Centered Politics 92
  • Notes 112
  • 7 - The New Politics on Capitol Hill 118
  • Notes 148
  • 8 - Campaigns and Parties in the Senate 154
  • Notes 176
  • 9 - The New Conventional Wisdom, Fraying at Its Edges 181
  • Notes 204
  • 10 - The Resilience of Campaign-Centered Politics 211
  • Notes 220
  • Index 223
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.