The Triumph of Campaign-centered Politics

By David Menefee-Libey | Go to book overview

10
The Resilience of Campaign-Centered Politics

It's like deja vu all over again.

-- Yogi Berra

Throughout the turmoil of the 1990s, the campaign-centered electoral order remained largely intact. The previous chapters show that the major parties' national organizations have come to play an important role in sustaining the new politics, and this chapter begins with a brief overview of their influence over politicians and other political professionals. Next the chapter explores recent changes in patterns of representation, deliberation, and choice, showing that new technologies and practices have not fundamentally challenged the central dimensions of campaigncentered politics. I close the book looking forward and asking a broader question: what are the implications of the new politics for representative democracy in America?


The Parties as Partners in the New Politics

The Accomodationist paradigm remains the dominant way Democratic and Republican leaders and activists think about and respond to the campaign-centered electoral order. Though the blending of Textbook Party strategies with Accomodationist analyses and strategies by House Republicans stands out as a striking anomaly, most leaders and activists within the national party organizations have embraced the inevitability of campaign-centered politics as conventional wisdom. In doing so, they have in turn exercised a surprisingly strong influence over many Americans' understanding of contemporary politics.

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The Triumph of Campaign-centered Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Parties, Elections, and American Democracy 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - The Campaign-Centered Electoral Order 11
  • Notes 27
  • 3 - The Foundations of Campaign-Centered Politics 32
  • Notes 44
  • 4 - Campaign-Centered Politics Leaves the Parties Behind 49
  • Notes 63
  • 5 - Reform and the Search for a New Party-Centered Politics 66
  • Notes 86
  • 6 - Embracing Campaign-Centered Politics 92
  • Notes 112
  • 7 - The New Politics on Capitol Hill 118
  • Notes 148
  • 8 - Campaigns and Parties in the Senate 154
  • Notes 176
  • 9 - The New Conventional Wisdom, Fraying at Its Edges 181
  • Notes 204
  • 10 - The Resilience of Campaign-Centered Politics 211
  • Notes 220
  • Index 223
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