Contesting Markets: Analyses of Ideology, Discourse and Practice

By Roy Dilly | Go to book overview

existential effects of rampant liberalism on the crucified nation, and a further convergence with the Andean religious world. 44 For the 'Devil' is the producer of raw metal which is changed into means of circulation in the mint. And protectionism continued strong among a majority of the population well after the silver-barons' political victory in 1872. In 1875 we can even hear the dance-groups (comparsas) chanting during the bull-running at the Sucre Carnival:

Comes the bull with the black horns, Death to the free extraction of silver! 45

In this heated moment, it almost appears as though 'Ahriman' himself, in the form of the black-horned bull, is about to burst into the streets and market-places.

The devil's presence is also signalled by the rampant trade in silver bullion in the last decades of the century -- overflowing from the mines in greater quantities than ever before, only to by-pass the Potosi mint and flow in torrents along the new roads and railways towards the ports of exportation. In 1980, sacrificial battles in the silver- mining city of Colquechaca, staged traditionally by the indian communities, were enlarged by the mining work-force who, furious at the disappearance of their salaries overseas, organised riots against the foreign export houses. Amidst this cosmological crisis, the indians clung to the idealised memory of the old tributary state, with its imagined orderly circulation of state-minted coins: under siege from the devils of liberalism, it was this memory which, at the end of the century, provided a psychological trampoline for the great uprising of Aymara and Quechua communities during the Bolivian Civil War (cf. Platt 1987b, 1991).


CONCLUSIONS

The referential and poetic aspects of metaphor run through this account of the liberalprotectionist debate and its consequences for Andean forms of exchange. The frustrations of late twentieth-century capitalism have shifted interest from politico-economic structures to the analysis of the discursive strategies by which these structures are empowered. The frontiers between 'economic science' and 'native models' can thus be interrogated and subverted -- a belated academic response, no doubt, to the needs of the people on the receiving end who have long queried the authority of 'the economists'. It becomes possible to recognise the way in which economic policies are themselves embedded in and controlled through discourse: the rampant triumphalism of the New Right, like the liberalism of nineteenth-century Bolivia and its associated historiography, is only one example of this. More generally, neo-liberal economics can be confronted with many other discourses which do not pretend that economic and social policy can be deduced simply from the 'natural human propensity to exchange'.

In nineteenth-century Bolivia, the protectionist camp converged with an Andean counter-discourse of tributary justice and the socio-political correlates of exchange under divine protection. If the discourse of free trade overwhelmed the protectionist alternative, this was not because it was more efficient or beneficial, but because it managed to leave its rival behind in the invocation of scriptural authority and in the manipulation of parliamentary politics in order to attract foreign capital and reinvest in an internationalised mining industry. Protectionist monetary policy did not

-150-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Contesting Markets: Analyses of Ideology, Discourse and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.