Eroding Empire: Western Relations with Eastern Europe

By Lincoln Gordon; J. F. Brown et al. | Go to book overview

THREE
Eastern Europe's Western Connection

J. F. BROWN

THE REALITIES of Soviet domination and of communist rule necessitate that Western policy toward Eastern Europe be conducted on two levels: the state and the societal. The same differentiation is necessary when one considers East European attitudes toward the West. Indeed, on this topic it is essential to recognize not only differentiations but also distinctions, subtleties of perception, and shades of meaning.

East European regimes have tended to view links with Western governments mainly in a tactical way: as means of economic support, sources of Western technology, instruments of legitimation vis-à-vis their populations, and sometimes, as Romania has most conspicuously done, as ways to expand their maneuverability in relations with Moscow. But no regime has ever sought a genuine rapprochement with the Western powers, not only because the Soviet Union would not permit it but also because it would be a threat to the very survival of the regime concerned.

For their part, many members of today's East European societies would like nothing better than a rapprochement with the West. In fact, they tend to see the West in idealized terms of liberty and prosperity, the antithesis of what they have experienced under communist rule. There are distinctions to be made among the attitudes of East European societies toward the West, however, mostly as a result of their past. The ruling and educated classes of Bohemia, Moravia, Poland, Hungary, Romania, Serbia, and Croatia had an

-39-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eroding Empire: Western Relations with Eastern Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword ix
  • Contents xi
  • Contents xiii
  • ONE Introduction and Overview 1
  • TWO The East European Setting 8
  • THREE Eastern Europe's Western Connection 39
  • FOUR Interests and Policies in Eastern Europe: The View from Washington 67
  • FIVE The View from Bonn: The Tacit Alliance 129
  • SIX The View from Paris 188
  • SEVEN The View from London 232
  • EIGHT The Views from Vienna and Rome 269
  • Nine Convergence and Conflict: Lessons for the West 292
  • Appendix Tables 330
  • A Note on the Authors 345
  • Index 349
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 360

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.