Gothic Architecture in England and France

By George Herbert West | Go to book overview

THE CLASSIFICATION OF GOTHIC

EARLY in the last century Rickman proposed a fourfold classification of the chief styles of English church architecture based on their most obvious characteristics, the treatment of the windows and the mouldings. He occupies in the study of Gothic architecture much the same position that W. Smith did with regard to geology, Linnæus to botany. As in the system of the latter, and indeed as in all early classificatory systems, the points by which Rickman's periods were distinguished were minor details which, though the most obvious, like the number of stamens in a flower, did not represent the principles on the working out of which the evolution of the art had really depended. They had the further disadvantage of giving the impression that each style was sharply separated from its neighbours, just as in early geology we used to be taught that the periods were separated from each other by great catastrophes, after which a fresh start had to be made. Yet as we still retain to a great extent the terminology of those pre-Lyellian days in geology, so may we in architecture. The system of Rickman, even as improved by Sharpe, corresponds to the Linnæan in botany in being "an artificial method, because it takes into account only a few marked characters," and gives no account of the causes or history of that evolutionary process which governs the works of man as well as of creation. "It is an index, not a scientific or natural arrangement, but has a facility of application which commends it to the tyro."1 At the same time the names do represent facts, and until better ones are agreed upon we must continue to use them if we are to have any classification at all.

____________________
1
"Encyc-. Britannica," art. Botany.

-xxiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gothic Architecture in England and France
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 349

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.