Gothic Architecture in England and France

By George Herbert West | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
VALTLTING

SINCE this chapter must be somewhat technical, the following abstract may be of use.

The origin of Gothic lies in the attempt to vault a basilica, and in the consequent use of ribbed vaults. These sprang from the groined or intersecting vault derived from the Romans. The groined vault was a solid mass consisting of two equal semi-cylindrical tunnels crossing at right angles. The Gothic vault consisted of arched ribs placed at right angles to each other and diagonally, forming a skeleton of stone work above all oblong or square space, and supporting thin independent stone panels, which in France are made up of a number of flat arches of small stones thrown from rib to rib, and which are therefore self-supporting. In England they are frequentlt, not arched, but flat, is if made of planks, and consequently weak and in need of intermediate ribs (tiercerons) to support them. The pointed arch was used as a means of getting the summits of the arches approximately level.

The diagonals and interniediate tiercerons being of different lengths would rise to different heights; their curve therefore was altered in the upper part to keep all the crowns level. Hence arose the fourcentred arch. To hide the breaks of curve, cross-pieces -- liernes -- were inserted with bosses at the intersections (lierne vaulting). If the ribs are very numerous and have all the same curve, an inverted cone or fan results from this construction (fan vaulting).

THE development of Gothic architecture springs from the attempt to put a stone roof on the thin walls of the central aisle of a basilica, a thing which the Romans had never tried to do. They had put concrete vaults over the great halls of their baths, and had built domes of horizontally1 coursed brickwork as at the Pantheon, in both of which cases the thrust became very small as soon as the wonderful pozzolana mortar had set; but when the boundless resources of the Empire had failed such work became

____________________
1
Chedanne, "R. I. B. A. JI.," January 1895.

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gothic Architecture in England and France
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 349

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.