Different Voices: Women and the Holocaust

By Carol Rittner; John K. Roth | Go to book overview

26
Joan Ringelheim

So much work on women and the Holocaust remains to be done. What has been researched thus far merely touches the surface of a complex and difficult field of study.

JOAN RINGELHEIM

If anyone is the founding mother of women's Holocaust studies, Joan Ringelheim deserves to be among the top contenders for the distinction. Yean ago this philosopher and historian was organizing conferences, writing essays, and setting agendas for research in this area. She did so even when critics told her that such concerns were inappropriate or morally questionable because, it was mistakenly alleged, they would distract attention from more important Holocaust issues. Ringelheim wisely persisted, and her efforts show signs of paying off. More attention has been paid to issues involving women and the Holocaust, and it is likely that even more will be paid in the future. Meanwhile, few if any scholars are more knowledgeable about this subject. Whenever she speaks or writes about women and the Holocaust, other students of the Holocaust must take notice.

"Different horrors, same hell"-- Ringelheim uses equally potent words to make points related to Myrna Goldenberg's succinct phrase. Underscoring that "surviving is different from living" and that "oppression does not make people better, oppression makes people oppressed," Ringelheim speaks about double jeopardy. What she means and wants to explore she summarizes effectively in her 1990 essay, "Thoughts about Women and the Holocaust":

Jewish women suffered both as Jews and as women from anti-semitism and sexism in their genocidal forms. More women were deported than men. More women were killed

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Different Voices: Women and the Holocaust
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • ALSO BY CAROL RITTNER AND JOHN K. ROTH ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps and Photographs ix
  • Preface xi
  • Prologue Women and the Holocaust 1
  • General Suggestions for Further Reading 20
  • Chronology 22
  • Part One Voices of Experience 35
  • Notes 39
  • 1: Ida Fink 40
  • 2: Etty Hillesum 46
  • Notes 57
  • 3: Charlotte Delbo 58
  • 4: Isabella Leitner 65
  • 5: Olga Lengyel 69
  • 6: Livia E. Bitton Jackson 73
  • 7: Pelagia Lewinska 84
  • 8: Charlotte Delbo 99
  • 9: Gisella Perl 104
  • 10: Olga Lengyel 119
  • 11: Anna Heilman and Rose Meth 130
  • Notes 134
  • Notes 141
  • 12: Sara Nomberg-Przytyk 143
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 149
  • Part Two Voices of Interpretation 155
  • Notes 159
  • 13: Gisela Bock 161
  • Notes 179
  • 14: Marion A. Kaplan 187
  • Notes 207
  • 15: Sybil Milton 213
  • Notes 237
  • 16: Vera Laska 250
  • Notes 267
  • 17: Gitta Sereny 270
  • Preface 271
  • 18: Claudia Koonz 287
  • Notes 304
  • 19: Magda Trocmeé 309
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 317
  • Part Three Voices of Reflection 319
  • Notes 323
  • 20: Irena Klepfisz 324
  • 21: Charlotte Delbo 328
  • 22: Ida Fink 332
  • 23: Deborah E. Lipstadt 349
  • 24: Mary Jo Leddy 355
  • 25: Rachel Altman 363
  • Notes 372
  • 26: Joan Ringelheim 373
  • Notes 400
  • Appendices 406
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 419
  • Epilogue - Different Voices 421
  • Notes 426
  • Glossary 427
  • Index 431
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