On Modern American Art: Selected Essays

By Robert Rosenblum | Go to book overview

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
1. John Singleton Copley, Watson and the Shark, 1778. Oil on canvas, 71¾ x 90½ in. (182.2 x 229.8 cm). National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Ferdinand Lammot Belin Fund, 1963
2. Benjamin West, The Death of General Wolfe, 1770. Oil on canvas, 60 x 84 in. (152.6 x 214.5 cm). National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, transfer from the Canadian War Memorials, 1921 (Gift of the 2nd Duke of Westminster, Eaton Hall, Cheshire, 1918)
3. Gilbert Stuart, The Skater [Portrait of William Grant), 1782. Oil on canvas, 96⅝ x 58⅛ in. (243.3 x 147.6 cm). National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
4. Martin Johnson Heade, Coastal Scene with Sinking Ship, 1863. Oil on canvas, 40¼ x 70¼ in. (102.2 x 178.4 cm). Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, Vermont . Photo: Ted Hendrickson
5. Winslow Homer, Long Branch, New Jersey, 1869. Oil on canvas, 16 x 21¾ in. (40.6 x 55.2 cm). Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, The Hayden Collection
6. Thomas Eakins, The Concert Singer, 1892. 75⅜ x 54⅜ in. (190.8 x 137.5 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art, Given by Mrs. Thomas Eakins and Miss Mary Adeline Williams. Photo: A. J. Wyatt
7. Albert Pinkham Ryder, Toilers of the Sea, 1880-84. Oil on wood, 11½ x 12 in. (29.2 x 30.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, George A. Hearn Fund, 1915 (15.32)
8. Augustus Vincent Tack, Night, Amargosa Desert, 1937. Oil on canvas on plywood panel, 83¾ x 48 in. (212.7 x 121.9 cm). The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.
9. Augustus Vincent Tack, Aspiration. Mural commissioned 1928. Oil on canvas, 76½ x 135½ in. (194.3 x 344.2 cm). The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.
10. Augustus Vincent Tack, Flight, 1930. Oil on canvas mounted on wallboard panel, 43⅞ x 35 in. [111.4 x 90.8 cm). The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.
11. Colin Campbell Cooper, View of Wall Street, c. 1915. Oil on canvas, 21 x 17 in. (53.3 x 43.2 cm). Photo: Courtesy Vance Jordan Fine Art, Inc., New York
12. Man Ray, New York or Export Commodity, 1920. Gelatin silver print, 11½ x 8 in. (29.2 x 20.3 cm). The Menil Collection, Houston, Texas. © 1999 The Man Ray Trust, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris
13. Joseph Stella, Study for Skyscraper, c. 1922. Location unknown. Reproduced in Margaret Anderson and Jane Heap, eds., The Little Review 9, no. 3 (Autumn 1922). Berg Collection of English and American Literature, The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations
14. Florine Stettheimer, New York, 1918. Oil on canvas, 48 x 42 in. (121.9 x 106.6 cm). Collection William Kelly Simpson
15. Juliette Roche, Brooklyn St. George Hotel Piscine, c. 1918. Oil on paper mounted on wooden board, 41 x 30 in. (105 x 76 cm). Fondation Albert Gleizes, Paris. © 1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ ADAGP, Paris
16. Thomas Hart Benton, Persephone, 1939. Tempera with oil on canvas, 72 x 56 in. (182.9 x 142.2 cm). Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri, Purchase, acquired through the Yellow Freight Foundation of Art Acquisition Fund and the generosity of Mrs. Herbert O. Peet, Richard J. Stern, the Doris Jones Stein Foundation, the Jacob L. and Ella C. Loose Foundation, Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Levin, and Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Rich. © T. H. Benton and R. P. Benton Testamentary Trusts / Licensed by VAGA, New York, N.Y.
17. Peter Blume, Parade, 1930. Oil on canvas, 49¼ x 56⅜ in. (125.1 x 143.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo

-366-

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