Sunfield Painter: The Reminiscences of John Davenall Turner

By John Davenall Turner | Go to book overview

7
Sketches for Five Dollars

An event of importance above all others was my marriage to Grace Robertson on 15 August 1928. My conscience still arises accusingly to remind me that I assumed this great responsibility without means to justify such a step. In fact, I had to borrow five dollars from my bride to take us home from our honeymoon, a period at Banff.

We travelled to Banff over the gravel roads in Alan's ancient Chevrolet with an average of two flat tires per day. It was kind of him to lend it to us for the two weeks, but car problems together with the restrictions placed upon us by my lack of finances were but a foretaste of the rough seas through which we were destined to sail together in the future. That we navigated them successfully from the outset was due mainly to Grace's fortitude and wisdom, the main stabilizing factors throughout. Without them we should have inevitably landed on the rocks.

At the time of our marriage, I was employed in the local agency of a cash register company. It was a fairly congenial occupation. The staff

-59-

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Sunfield Painter: The Reminiscences of John Davenall Turner
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor's Note: vi
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - The Ten-Dollar Homestead 1
  • 2 - Settling In 10
  • 3 - A New Way of Life 21
  • 4 - The Second Farm 31
  • 5 - Looking for a Job 39
  • 6 - The Edmonton Plastic Display Company 45
  • 7 - Sketches for Five Dollars 59
  • 8 - Expedition to the East 68
  • 9 - Home Again 85
  • 10 - The War Years 95
  • 11 - The Art Gallery 109
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