Man's Quest for Social Guidance: The Study of Social Problems

By Howard W. Odum | Go to book overview
1. The schools retard the development of the brightest student in favor of the group.
2. The schools are trying to cover too much ground, with the result that the students lack thoroughness.
3. Graduates from our public schools have considerable information but they do not seem to have developed habits of accuracy, neatness, concentration, industry and how to study.
4. The schools are too self-centered, they do not keep in touch with the changing requirements of the environments with which their graduates will have to cope.
5. The schools seem more interested in teaching their students how to enjoy the privileges of life than they are in teaching them to work and assume responsibilities.
6. The schools are allowing athletics, dances, and extraschool activities to interfere seriously with the constructive development of their students.
7. The majority of students are not given sufficient exercise properly to develop their bodies.
8. Graduates of the high schools do not have the proper attitude toward work, they are seeking "white collar" jobs rather than going in for the more fundamental trades.
9. The teachers in general do not seem to appreciate the cultural value of English, economics, and shop work as compared with Latin and Greek.
10. A good many of the higher-grade students hesitate to take up work in industry because they have observed that the students with inferior mental equipment are generally segregated for industrial work.
11. The public school teachers are not interested in industrial affairs and do not appreciate the extent to which the welfare of all depends on industry.

FOR FURTHER STUDY

For Information
1. Catalogue causes, historical and current, of the conflict between capital and labor.
2. Distinguish between the open shop and closed shop policies.
3. What was the cost to the public of strikes in 1924 as stated by the Open Shop Committee of the National Association of Manufacturers? What was the cost to the workers?

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