Origins of the Whig Party

By E. Malcolm Carroll | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

The following maps showing the relative strength of parties in the presidential elections of 1832, 1836, and 1840 require explanation in regard to apparent omissions as well as to their significance. Although based upon county returns, county lines have not been shown within areas of the same political complection. Important omissions appear in the map for the election of 1832 in the southern states as a result of the absence of data. In South Carolina the presidential electors were chosen then as well as in the two later elections by the state legislature. They were elected in Georgia on a state-wide ticket, but the returns indicate a majority for the Jackson electors of sixty to seventy-five percent. Although the vote was taken by counties in Alabama and Missouri, the relative unimportance of the vote in these States and their situation on the frontier explain in part the failure of contemporary statisticians to record their returns. The total vote in Alabama was said to be approximately twenty thousand, and of these the Jackson ticket was credited with a majority of sixty to seventy-five percent.1 The counties in Missouri which reported numerical majorities with few exceptions gave a large Democratic vote.2 In Vermont and Massachusetts the Anti-Masons ran their own lists of presidential electors, but their vote has been combined with that of the National Republicans as being in the main sympathetic with their political aims.

A comparison of the maps for 1832 and 1836 demonstrates, more clearly for the northern than for the southern states, the succession of the Whig from the National Republican party. Approval of Jackson's policies was

____________________
1
Matthias Benjamin, The Politician's Register ( Philadelphia, 1835), pp. 76ff.
2
St. Louis Republican, November 20, 1832.

-259-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Origins of the Whig Party
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I - John Quincy Adams and the National Republican Party 1
  • Chapter II - The Campaign of 1832 29
  • Chapter III - The Crisis of 1833 71
  • Chapter IV - Party Strategy and New Leadership 118
  • Chapter V - Expediency Versus Consistency 171
  • Conclusions 221
  • Bibliography 228
  • Index 239
  • Appendix 259
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 264

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.