Failed Revolutions: Social Reform and the Limits of Legal Imagination

By Richard Delgado; Jean Stefancic | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book grew out of continuing conversations between us and many others on social reform and law. For suggestions, critique, and encouragement we thank our colleagues Derrick Bell, Robert Berring, Harriet Cummings, John Denvir, Andrea Dworkin, David Getches, Robert Gordon, Laura Lederer, Catharine MacKinnon, Robert Nagel, Robert Post, john powell, George Priest, Margaret Radin, Pierre Schlag, Charles Wilkinson, and Sharon Zukin.

Though writing a book is a solitary venture, thinking, organizing, sifting, and discarding have a communal, or interactive, dimension. They cannot occur in a vacuum. We owe large debts to each of our colleagues and undoubtedly many others who enriched our thinking about law's role in social change. In particular, we presented parts of this book at conferences, workshops, and colloquia at the University of Chicago, Stanford, Vanderbilt, Washington and Lee, Cornell, University of Colorado, and University of San Francisco law schools and at Michigan State University, CUNY-Brooklyn College, Grinnell College, and the Villa Serbelloni. We are grateful to those in attendance for their comments and criticisms.

For research assistance we thank Charles Church, Devona Futch, Liz Griffin, Bonnie Grover, Alenka Han, Susan Raitt, Kelly Robinson, Erich Schwiesow, Karl Stith, and Patricia Templar. We also thank Marjorie Brunner, Kimberly Clay, Anne Guthrie, Cynthia Shafer, and Kay Wilkie for preparing many drafts expertly and with patience and unfailing good humor. We are grateful to the University of Colorado Law School and the University of San Francisco Law School for providing encouragement and material support. Special thanks go to our editor, Spencer Carr, for offering just the right balance of encouragement and critique.

The following journals graciously granted permission to adapt material that appeared in their reviews: Cornell Law Review, Texas Law Review, Stanford Law Review, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, University of Colorado Law Review, Ohio State Law Journal, Vanderbilt Law Review, and William and Mary Law Review.

-xiii-

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