The Director's & Officer's Guide to Advisory Boards

By Robert K. Mueller | Go to book overview
1. The trick is to manage the relationship between insensitive, power-driven hierarchical models and individual-centered networks. This calls for a new education or learning about empowerment models for both individuals and organizations, and means to readily tap these sources of information.

Anthropology has shown us a way to achieve a balance of dealing with hierarchical, bureaucratic and networking organizations by interweaving both of these model structures and empowering them when appropriate. It also shows ways to access far-flung centers of information not readily accessible by conventional business channels. Engaging well-positioned advisors in various external networks can extend a corporation's access to valuable perspectives. Networking is perhaps the ultimate in local autonomy action. It is a one-on-one theory of action and it is becoming a recognized model in organizational and advisory work.

Austria's highest military decoration--the Order of Maria Theresa--is reserved exclusively for officerships for those who turned the tide of battle by taking matters into their own hands and actively disobeying orders. Maria Theresa can teach us how to turn the battle tides of complex organizational work by empowering the hidden networks that are "waiting in silence for the moment of expression." 6 Advisory directors can be of significance in accessing their networks outside the corporation.


NOTES
1.
See H. Igor Ansoff, "Conceptual Underpinnings of Systematic Strategic Management," European Journal of Operational Research 2, 19 ( 1985), for an interesting discussion that guided this thinking on the environmental changes underway.
2.
Vernon Boggs and William Kornblum, "Symbiosis in the City," The Sciences (January/ February 1985), pp. 25-50.
3.
Claudia Rossett, "How Peru Got a Free Market Without Really Trying," Wall Street Journal ( January 27, 1984).
4.
Virginia Hine, "The Basic Paradigm of a Future Socio-Cultural System," World Issues (April/ May 1977); also coauthor with Luther Gerlach of People, Power and Change ( New York: Bobbs-Merrill, 1970); and of Life Way Leap: The Dynamics of Change in America ( Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1972).
5.
Portions of this chapter have been adapted from the author's Corporate Networking: Building Channels for Information and Influence ( New York: The Free Press, Macmillan, Inc., 1986).
6.
Michel Foucault, Les Mots et les Choses, translated as The Order of Things, An Archaeology of the Human Sciences ( New York: Random House, Vintage Books Edition, 1973; original edition 1966 by Editions Gallimard), p. xx.

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The Director's & Officer's Guide to Advisory Boards
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles from Quorum Books ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Advisors Unlimited 9
  • Notes 26
  • 2 - Driving Forces 27
  • Notes 35
  • 3 - Counseling Versus Consulting Versus Mentoring 37
  • Notes 41
  • 4 - Role of an Advisory Board or Council 43
  • Notes 64
  • 5 - Activity and Societal Scan 65
  • 6 - Species of Advisory Boards 77
  • Notes 88
  • 7 - Weak-Signal Governance/Early Warning Advisory Systems 89
  • Notes 101
  • 8 - Advising Non- Profit-Seeking Versus Profit- Seeking Organizations 103
  • Notes 108
  • 9 - Care and Feeding of Advisory Boards 111
  • Notes 121
  • 10 - Insurance, Indemnification, and Contractual Matters 123
  • Notes 134
  • 11 - Advisory View of Corporate Strategy 135
  • Notes 148
  • 12 - Advisory Board Perspectives: Stakeholder Strategy 149
  • Notes 170
  • 13 - The Power of Advisory Board Networks 173
  • Notes 187
  • 14 - Advising the Family Business Board 189
  • Notes 201
  • 15 - Cultural Realities Facing Advisory Boards 203
  • 16 - Advising on Nonprofit Trusteeship Pathologies 223
  • Notes 240
  • Appendix ADVISEE SEARCH: GETTING INVITED TO SERVE AS ADVISOR 241
  • Notes 255
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY AND REFERENCE READING LIST 257
  • Index 263
  • About the Author 279
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