The American Welfare System: Origins, Structure, and Effects

By Howard Gensler | Go to book overview
Save to active project

About the Editor and Contributors

John Drew received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Cornell University, where he wrote his dissertation on the origins of the American welfare system. In 1989, he won the American Political Science Association's William Anderson Award for the best Ph.D. dissertation in the nation in his field. Drew has taught at Williams College and the University of Oregon, and currently teaches at Los Angeles Mission College.

Howard Gensler is an Assistant Professor of Business Law and Taxation in the Accounting Department at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Gensler holds a J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Irvine. His dissertation was on the American welfare system. He is the former Dean of the Northrop University School of Law and Graduate Tax Program and has published several articles on tax policy and the economics of welfare. Gensler is particularly interested in the potential for reform of both the welfare and the income tax systems through a negative income tax approach. Gensler notes that a flat tax combined with a refundable credit can replicate most progressive rate schedules, simplify the tax law, and solve many of the problems with welfare.

D. Eric Schansberg is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Indiana University-Southeast in New Albany. Since earning his Ph.D. in Economics at Texas A&M University, he has published a number of academic journal articles on the congressional labor market, especially concerning the effects of term limits on Congress and politicians. His articles have appeared in Economics and Politics, Public Choice, and Economic Inquiry. He is also the author of a book on public policies that affect the poor: Poor Policy: How Government Harms the Poor. The book analyzes welfare policy and features a discussion of how interest groups use political markets to benefit themselves -- but in a way that inadvertently, but consistently, harms the poor.

-295-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Welfare System: Origins, Structure, and Effects
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?