Foreshadows of the Law: Supreme Court Dissents and Constitutional Development

By Donald E. Lively | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
FREEDOM OF SPEECH: THE "INDISPENSABLE" LIBERTY

Freedom of expression has been described in various ways and at various times as the most essential constitutional guarantee. Typifying its special esteem in the constitutional order is the Supreme Court's characterization of freedom of speech, in Palko v. Connecticut, as "the matrix, the indispensable condition of every other form of freedom." Recognition of the nexus between freedom and general liberty predated the First Amendment. John Milton, in 1644, wrote that "the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, [is] above all liberties." The natural law theories of John Locke, which were especially influential in the development of the Declaration of Independence, also emphasized freedom of expression as a crucial liberty that facilitated the enjoyment of other rights.


The First Amendment: Background and Early History

Unlike the Fourteenth Amendment, freedom of speech and the press was not an immediate subject of litigation and interpretation. Not until the twentieth century, as expressive freedom was included within the meaning of liberty secured by the Fourteenth Amendment, did the Court seriously probe its significance, develop pertinent principles and amplify its content. Belated jurisprudential attention to the First Amendment did not indicate a record free of official speech management and control. Suppression of expression is a tradition that evolved coextensively with methodologies for efficient reproduction and mass dissemination of printed information. English licensing laws, which governed the printing industry

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Foreshadows of the Law: Supreme Court Dissents and Constitutional Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • INTRODUCTION: JUDICIAL REVIEW AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT xiii
  • Bibliography xxvi
  • Chapter 1 a Constitutional Right in Slavery 1
  • Bibliography 22
  • Chapter 2 Images of a New Union 25
  • Bibliography 41
  • Chapter 3 Constitutional Redefinition and National Reconstruction 43
  • Bibliography 60
  • Chapter 4 the Rise, Demise and Resurrection of Substantive Due Process 63
  • Bibliography 85
  • Chapter 5 Color and the Constitution 87
  • Bibliography 111
  • Chapter 6 Freedom of Speech: the "Indispensable" Liberty 113
  • Bibliography 134
  • Chapter 7 the Right to Be Let Alone 137
  • Bibliography 158
  • AFTERWORD 161
  • Index 163
  • About the Author 169
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 172

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.