Border Life: Experience and Memory in the Revolutionary Ohio Valley

By Elizabeth A. Perkins | Go to book overview
Save to active project

They see none about them to whom or to whose families they [have] been accustomed to think themselves inferior.

GEORGE NICHOLAS


The Politics of Power

In the political landscape of late- eighteenth-centuryAmerica, back settlers occupied a barbarous terrain. Popular images of western anarchy and lawlessness prompted metropolitan observers to view frontier inhabitants virtually as "wild men" living "in a perfect state of war" until the arrival of gentry leaders and the formal institutions of church and state. Benjamin Rush, for example, thought first settlers nearly related to Indians in their manners, while Crèvecoeur termed them simply "carnivorous animals of a superior rank." Political theorists influenced by the Scottish Enlightenment commonly agreed that primitivism befell those western migrants who pushed beyond the restraints of civil society. Although prominent figures such as Thomas Jefferson espoused more optimistic views of westward migration, Crèvecoeur spoke for many far more skeptical observers in describing the earliest backwoods settlers as "a kind of forlorn hope, preceding by ten or twelve years" the respectable migrants who followed in their wake. 1

An evolutionary perspective has continued to characterize modern

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Border Life: Experience and Memory in the Revolutionary Ohio Valley
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?