North Carolina Civil War Documentary

By W. Buck Yearns; John G. Barret | Go to book overview

VIII
THE CALL TO ARMS

One historian wrote that " North Carolina's greatest contribution to the Confederacy was man power--the high number of soldiers who bore the brunt of scores of battles."1 She had one-ninth of the population of the Confederacy and furnished over one-seventh of its troops: 111,000 men organized into seventy-two regiments, 10,000 reserves comprising eight regiments, and 4,000 home guardsmen. North Carolinians killed in battle numbered 19,673, more than one-fourth the Confederate total. One-fifth of the Confederate losses in the Seven Days Battle around Richmond, one-fourth of those at Gettysburg, and one-third of those at Fredericksburg were North Carolinian. One-fifth of Lee's men who surrendered at Appomattox were North Carolinian. Those who died of disease numbered 20,602. North Carolina's total war casualties were greater than that of any other state. Since the United States had two and one-half times the population of the Confederacy, this great drain of manpower was the state's supreme sacrifice for southern independence.

Because of the South's long and strong military tradition, each state that joined the Confederacy possessed a well-organized volunteer militia system. In previous wars they had formed the basis of the national army, and in his inaugural address President Davis advised Congress to continue this practice. During the spring of 1861 Congress established the system that was to be used until the adoption of conscription. On the local level men would form a company, elect their officers, and then offer the company to the governor. He would organize companies into regiments, appoint the regimental officers, and send them all to camps of instruction for basic military training. Finally the governor would offer the regiments to the president for specific terms of enlistment, generally for twelve months but frequently for only six if the company's term of enlistment so stipulated. The president would then organize the

____________________
1
Hugh T. Lefler and Albert R. Newsome, North Carolina, The History of a Southern State, p. 430.

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
North Carolina Civil War Documentary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • ILLLUSTRATIONS ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • I- a Time for Decision 3
  • II- North Carolina Secedes 18
  • III- North Carolina Invaded, 1861-1862 28
  • IV- War in Eastern North Carolina, 1862-1864 43
  • V- Blockade-Running 65
  • VI- Fort Fisher 79
  • VII- War in Central and Western Countries 93
  • VIII- The Call to Arms 125
  • IX- Problems of Procurement 155
  • X- State Socialism 174
  • XI- Bearing the Costs of War 188
  • XII- The War and the Rairoads 204
  • XIII- The Economy of Scarcities 213
  • XIV- Church and School 225
  • XV- Victims of Attrition 246
  • XVI- Life Goes on at Home 265
  • XVII- State Rights and State Pride 272
  • XVIII- The Peace Movement 291
  • XIX- Wartime Politics 307
  • XX- Sherman in North Carolina 321
  • Bibliography 343
  • Index 351
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 370

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.