Transforming the Appalachian Countryside: Railroads, Deforestation, and Social Change in West Virginia, 1880-1920

By Ronald L. Lewis | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER EIGHT
"NEW MEN" VERSUS "OLD MEN": POLITICAL ECONOMY AND THE COUNTY SEAT WARS

Industrial development profoundly altered the determinants of the political culture in West Virginia after the Civil War and Reconstruction. On the eve of deforestation in the 1880s, political culture had been aligned for a generation along the traditional axes of Democrat-Confederate-agrarian versus Republican-Unionist-industrial sympathies. With industrialization, however, economic interests marginalized all other concerns in both political parties. This blend of economics and political organization itself was an indicator of change in West Virginia, and it mirrored a national process that dominated American industrial development during the late nineteenth century. The role of railroad is clearly revealed in the "county seat wars." The railroad annihilated spatial relationships previously based on nature, and the idea that the county seat should be at the physical center of its county was one of the casualties of the new order in mountainous West Virginia. Struggles among local elites to relocate county seats along the transportation corridors where economic development would follow reflect the contours of

-211-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Transforming the Appalachian Countryside: Railroads, Deforestation, and Social Change in West Virginia, 1880-1920
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 350

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?