Notable Women in the Physical Sciences: A Biographical Dictionary

By Benjamin F. Shearer; Barbara S. Shearer | Go to book overview
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HELEN M. FREE
(1923--)
Chemist
Birth February 20, 1923
1944 B.S., College of Wooster, OH; began working as a chemist
at Miles Laboratories in Elkhart, IN
1947 Married Alfred H. Free
1975 Published Urinalysis in Clinical Laboratory Practice
1976 Professional Achievement Award, American Society for
Medical Technology
1978 M.A., Central Michigan University
1980 Garvan Medal, American Chemical Society; Distinguished
Alumni Award, College of Wooster
1990 President, American Association for Clinical Chemistry
1993 President, American Chemical Society
1995 First recipient of the Helen M. Free Public Outreach
Award

Helen M. Free has advanced the field of diagnostic chemistry by developing clinical laboratory tests that are effective and easy to use. In addition to making contributions to medical laboratory techniques, she has worked to promote chemistry and other sciences among the general public.

The daughter of Daisy (Piper) and James Summerville Murray, Helen Murray was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1923. She attended the College of Wooster in Ohio and graduated with honors with a B.S. in chemistry in 1944. Free later earned an M.A. in laboratory management from Central Michigan University in 1978. 1

After graduating from the College of Wooster, Free took a job as a chemist at Miles Laboratories (makers of Alka Seltzer) in Elkhart, Indiana. She worked her way up through the company, holding such positions as new products manager, director of clinical laboratory reagents, and director of marketing services of the research products division. Free currently serves as a consultant in professional relations of the diagnostics division of Miles Laboratories. 2 She is also an adjunct professor at Indiana University, South Bend.

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