Notable Women in the Physical Sciences: A Biographical Dictionary

By Benjamin F. Shearer; Barbara S. Shearer | Go to book overview
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ICIE GERTRUDE MACY HOOBLER (1892-1984) Biochemist
Birth July 23, 1892
1914 A.B., English, Central College for Women, Lexington, MO
1916 B.S., chemistry, University of Chicago
1916-18 Assistant Chemist, University of Colorado, Boulder
1918 Master's degree, University of Colorado, Boulder
1920 Ph.D., physiological chemistry, Yale University
1923-30 Director, Nutrition Research Laboratories, Merrill-Palmer
School and Children's Hospital of Michigan
1930-54 Director, Research Laboratory, Children's Fund of
Michigan
1938 Norlin Achievement Award, University of Colorado;
married B. Raymond Hoobler
1939 Borden Award, American Home Economics Association
1940 Certificate of Merit Group I, American Medical
Association
1946 Garvan Medal, American Chemical Society
1952 Osborne and Mendel Award, American Institute of
Nutrition
1954-74 Research Consultant, Merrill-Palmer Institute
1955 Modern Medicine Award for Distinguished Achievement,
Children's Hospital of Michigan
1972 Distinguished Service Award, Michigan Public Health
Association
Death January 6, 1984

Icie Gertrude Macy Hoobler called herself a "pioneer woman scientist." She blazed the trail for women in chemistry at a time when women scientists were few and not universally accepted by their male colleagues. Her research and leadership in the areas of the nutritional biochemistry and health of children and mothers, in particular, were vital contributions to science and the well-being of future generations.

The evolution of Macy's interest in science and the welfare of children

-197-

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Notable Women in the Physical Sciences: A Biographical Dictionary
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