Notable Women in the Physical Sciences: A Biographical Dictionary

By Benjamin F. Shearer; Barbara S. Shearer | Go to book overview
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form of discrimination was still fairly prevalent when Ines Mandl was honored in 1977 with the Carl Neuberg Medal by the American Society of European Chemists and Pharmacists. This prize, named after Mandl's erstwhile mentor and established in 1947, is awarded annually to "an outstanding personality credited with special contributions to science."

Until 1980, the Garvan Medal had been the only prize the American Chemical Society (ACS) awarded to female chemists. Women were not encouraged to compete with men for other ACS awards. (Only in 1967 did the ACS give a general award to a woman.) Francis P. Garvan ( 1875- 1938), a patent lawyer and the director of Chemical Foundation, had endowed the prize in 1935 to honor the achievements of women in the field. In 1982 the selection committee awarded the prize to Ines Mandl for her outstanding contributions to research in biochemistry.


Bibliography

American Men and Women of Science: A Biographical Directory of Today's Leaders in Physical, Biological and Related Sciences. 19th ed. New Providence, N.J.: R.R. Bowker, 1995.

Collagenase: First Interdisciplinary Symposium. Edited by Ines Mandl. New York: Gordon and Breach, 1972.

"Garvan Medal." Chemical and Engineering News 60 ( September 13, 1982): 54-55.

Herzenberg Caroline L. Women Scientists from Antiquity to the Present: An Index. West Cornwall, Conn.: Locust Hill Press, 1986.

Hochberg Edward. "Ines Hochmuth Mandl (1917- )," in Women in Chemistry and Physics: A Biobibliographic Sourcebook. Edited by Louise S. Grinstein, Rose K. Rose, and Miriam H. Rafailovich. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1993.

Mandl Ines. "Collagenase." Science 169 ( 1970): 1234-1238.

Mandl Ines, J. O. Cantor, M. Osman, et al. "Elastin Biosynthesis." Connective Tissue Research 15, no. 1-2 ( 1986): 9-12.

Woman's Who's Who of America. Edited by John William Leonard. New York: American Commonwealth, 1914. (Reprint: Detroit, Gale Research, 1976).

World Who's Who in Science: A Biographical Dictionary of Notable Scientists from Antiquity to the Present. Edited by Allen G. Debus. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who, 1968.

IRMGARD WOLFE

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