Notable Women in the Physical Sciences: A Biographical Dictionary

By Benjamin F. Shearer; Barbara S. Shearer | Go to book overview

VERA COOPER RUBIN (1928- ) Astronomer
Birth 1928
1948 B.A., Vassar College; married Robert Rubin
1951 M.A., Cornell University
1954 Ph.D., Georgetown University
1955 Research Astronomer, Georgetown University
1960 Assistant Professor, Georgetown University
1965 Joined Dept. of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution, as Research Associate; became Staff Member in about 1970
1981 Elected to National Academy of Sciences
1993 National Medal of Science

Astronomers long believed that visible matter--the stars and gas observed in galaxies--was essentially all the matter in the universe. Vera Rubin, however, has demonstrated that what can be seen is only about 10 percent of what really exists. An amazing 90 percent of our universe consists of dark, invisible matter. We know it is there because we can measure its effect on the orbits of visible stars and gas. Rubin's research has focused on the study of galaxies: their movement, their internal rotation, and their distribution. Her career has followed an unusual pattern; she has repeatedly done path-breaking work in fields decades before they were popular, moving on as the fields became crowded. As her work has made her famous, she has used her position to work for the advancement of women and minorities in science.

As a child, Vera Cooper fell in love with astronomy watching the night sky through her bedroom window. "I would prefer to stay up and watch the stars than go to sleep," she remembers. "There was just nothing as interesting in my life as watching the stars every night."1 With the help of her father, an electrical engineer, she built a small telescope through which she tried to photograph the moon. Because her telescope had no driving motor, the photographs were a "total flop," but the project was fun. At age 17 she went to Vassar College, where she knew that Maria Mitchell, the first American to discover a comet, had taught astronomy.

-350-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Notable Women in the Physical Sciences: A Biographical Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 484

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.